Father, kids work together in Cedar City towing company

This Father’s Day, Ladd Brindley is celebrating the opportunity to employ three of his children through his new towing company.

As a former mechanic and part-time tow truck driver for Cedar City Motor Company (formerly Parkway Autoplex), Ladd raised his children with a love for towing. Now three of them — Laramy, 23; Wyatt, 21; and Jessi, 18 — are in the towing business with him.

Image result for tow truck family

“They’ve been sitting next to me (in a tow truck) ever since they were able to sit in a car seat,” Ladd says. “My kids love tow trucks. They always have.”

Ladd notes that even though Laramy is only 23, he already has 21 years of experience in the business. Laramy began practicing towing skills in earnest as a teen. Ladd came home once to find him driving a pickup with a trailer around a makeshift obstacle course.

Even Laramy’s young son, Chaidyn, has caught the tow truck bug.

“He’s 2 years old and all his toys are tow trucks,” Laramy says. “It’s in his blood.”

Ladd recently struck a deal with Cedar City Motor Company to start his own business. He opened Ladd’s Towing, on Feb. 1, operating out of an office owned by Cedar City Motor in exchange for serving all of his previous employer’s towing needs.

Starting his own business also enabled Ladd to hand-pick his employees. Naturally he went to the three people he had personally trained for many years: his own kids.

Laramy and Wyatt both have commercial driver licenses, so they are able to drive the tow trucks. Jessi assists them on calls, often steering the broken-down vehicles as they are loaded on and off the tow trucks.

Jessi, who graduated from Canyon View High School last month, is already studying for her own CDL. She hopes to acquire her commercial license before she begins classes at Southern Utah University this fall to study business.

Like her brothers, the towing industry has intrigued Jessi since she was a small child.

“These guys are pretty much my role models — especially my dad,” Jessi says. “I like that he sees me as not a typical girly-girl.”

Laramy admits the male members of the family do worry about Jessi when they are out on certain jobs. But that worry also encourages them to teach her as much as they can.

Jessi says she’s grateful they don’t treat her like a “regular girl,” despite her slight build and long blond hair.

“We’re sticking to staying away from that stereotype,” she says. “That’s the plan.”

Ladd says they all try to avoid another stereotype: the “greasy, filthy tow truck driver.” In defiance of that stereotype they wear new Ladd’s Towing shirts and trucker-style hats with the company logo (Jessi’s hat is pink). The back of the hats display a little tow truck humor: “Get hooked on us.”

Ladd also insists that his tow trucks be clean, inside and out. Since she cannot yet drive the trucks, one of Jessi’s tasks is vacuuming the truck interiors to make sure they look professional.

“He’s a real stickler about that,” Jessi says of her father. “He wants the trucks to look nice.”

Jessi says it’s fun to tell people about her interest in towing. The only time her peers have given her a hard time about it was when she presented a report in school about how she wanted to be a tow truck driver.

Her eventual goal is to do the “big tows” associated with major automobile crashes. While she already rides along to help with clean-ups at crash sites, Jessi says she is still learning about all the aspects of responding to serious incidents.

As for working with his kids, Ladd calls it a “dream come true.”

“It’s not even like a job,” he says. “It’s like we’re on a vacation all the time, just hanging out.”

Laramy and Jessi joke that it’s like a vacation for their father because he gets to take every day off. After all, he’s the boss.

But when it comes down to it, they all recognize how lucky they are to have a father for a boss. Many fathers provide for their families in different ways, but they are able to say that their father has provided them with employment.

While individual tows often separate them, larger wrecks might bring the family members together at the same time. Ladd says he has a “no fighting” rule for his employees but Wyatt says their only disputes typically focus on who gets to drive the truck with the best stereo.

Past jobs have been a struggle for Laramy but now he says he doesn’t worry about getting fired. If he messes up while working for his dad, he knows the boss might just send him home for the day.

Ladd’s wife, Maria, says she admires the company her husband has built in less than five months.

“He has an idea and follows through,” she says. “It’s nice to see him succeed, to go from where he was to where he is now. I’m always amazed.”

Read more: http://www.thespectrum.com/story/life/2017/06/15/father-kids-work-together-cedar-city-towing-company/400552001/

The previous blog post Father, kids work together in Cedar City towing company is available on http://cork.apextowing.ie

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Illegal? Towing Company Demands Cash To Retrieve Personal Belongings

When a motorist’s car got towed, he desperately needed a few personal items from inside.

When he asked to retrieve the items from an impound lot, he was told: for a price.

Image result for tow truck family

Kalen Tartt’s car was legally towed to GTS towing’s site in Dolton. He didn’t have the money to get it out. He just wanted his belongings, including his Social Security card, his ID and his birth certificate. The car was towed while Tartt was job-hunting.

The clerk told him: “If you want any of your belongings out of the vehicle it’s $190.”

Another clerk at GTS had asked for money and the vehicle’s title.

When CBS 2’s Dorothy Tucker asked about the conditions, the clerk responded: “The owner of the company — those are his rules. It’s a private company.”

But those rules could violate a state statute that says vehicle owners may claim certain personal belongings, including eyeglasses, food, medicine, a wallet, identifying documents, cash and credit cards.

Demanding cash can be an intimidation tactic to get unknowing customers to get their cars out.

Tartt eventually paid the full $425 to get his car back.

“I don’t think it was fair but I had to do it,” he says.

Read More: http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2017/06/01/illegal-towing-company-demands-cash-to-retrieve-personal-belongings/

Illegal? Towing Company Demands Cash To Retrieve Personal Belongings was originally published to dublin.apextowing.ie

Illegal? Towing Company Demands Cash To Retrieve Personal Belongings

When a motorist’s car got towed, he desperately needed a few personal items from inside.

When he asked to retrieve the items from an impound lot, he was told: for a price.

Image result for tow truck family

Kalen Tartt’s car was legally towed to GTS towing’s site in Dolton. He didn’t have the money to get it out. He just wanted his belongings, including his Social Security card, his ID and his birth certificate. The car was towed while Tartt was job-hunting.

The clerk told him: “If you want any of your belongings out of the vehicle it’s $190.”

Another clerk at GTS had asked for money and the vehicle’s title.

When CBS 2’s Dorothy Tucker asked about the conditions, the clerk responded: “The owner of the company — those are his rules. It’s a private company.”

But those rules could violate a state statute that says vehicle owners may claim certain personal belongings, including eyeglasses, food, medicine, a wallet, identifying documents, cash and credit cards.

Demanding cash can be an intimidation tactic to get unknowing customers to get their cars out.

Tartt eventually paid the full $425 to get his car back.

“I don’t think it was fair but I had to do it,” he says.

Read More: http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2017/06/01/illegal-towing-company-demands-cash-to-retrieve-personal-belongings/

Illegal? Towing Company Demands Cash To Retrieve Personal Belongings is courtesy of http://dublin.apextowing.ie/

Just one hitch: Tales and tips from the tow-truck front line

It was an uncomfortable situation. There’s an adrenaline surge you experience when you break down. Your mind starts racing and your judgment becomes clouded.

Tow situations, especially on a busy highway, demand that drivers keep their wits about them and never forget the traffic hurtling past. (THINKSTOCK)

Tow situations, especially on a busy highway, demand that drivers keep their wits about them and never forget the traffic hurtling past. (THINKSTOCK)

While nobody anticipates breaking down, understanding what to do in advance can help you make good decisions when it’s time for a tow. We’ve talked with some of the area’s best wreckers to learn what to do during towing situations, and here’s their advice.

Your biggest danger after breaking down is getting hit by another vehicle.

“What you’re looking at draws your attention,” says 20-year veteran Darin Wade of Big D Towing.  If you’re in your vehicle, at least you have some protection from other cars, he says.

Wade has seen dozens of examples of looky-loos causing additional collisions at the scene of a tow.

“Highways are the worst places to try to fix your car or change a tire.  You have huge vehicles traveling by at high speeds,” he says.

The exception to this is if your car is out of sight in a ditch or the weather is extreme, says 30-year veteran Ray Caveness of Randy’s Towing in Wenatchee.

If you don’t have phone reception and you’re in a rural area, it might be better to hitch a ride to the nearest town.

If you do, leave a note outlining your plan, and think about where a tow driver will come from.  Often customers have to pay more because the wrecker must get the driver and then backtrack to get their car, he says.

Beware: freeways are 24-hour tow zones, so if you abandon your car, you’ll probably pay an impound fee and a ticket.

Know where you are

Before you call a towing service, figure out where you are. It’s the first question they’ll ask, says Emily Gerke-Wade, operations manager at Big D Towing.

Know which direction you’re going, look for cross streets, mile markers or think of the last town or landmark you saw.

Also, figure out how your GPS zooms out to reveal your location.

 Pull over quickly

When people notice car trouble, they think they can make it farther than they actually can, says Gerke-Wade.  “Often going those extra three miles to the next exit will wreck your engine.”

Costly repairs can often be avoided if you pull over at the first safe spot you find.

Reduce your towing bill in advance

Many auto insurance policies offer towing assistance for only a few dollars per month. If you only need one tow per year, it usually pays for itself, but you must sign up before you need it.

Gerke-Wade tells the story about a customer who called from the bar after he’d had too much to drink. Rather than risking a DUI and paying for a cab, he simply called for a tow truck to take him home, knowing his insurance would cover it.

AAA reimbursement

Towing is one of the biggest upsides to being an AAA Auto Club member. If their trucks are slow to dispatch, you have the right to choose another towing company and get reimbursed.

Have emergency supplies

Caveness often meets drivers stuck in the mountains wearing T-shirts and flip-flops in the winter, or summer drivers who are dehydrated because they’re waiting in a hot car with no water.
When your vehicle has issues, climate control will stop working. So when you travel be prepared with the basics like water and blankets.

Read More: http://www.seattletimes.com/nwshowcase/automotive/just-one-hitch-tales-and-tips-from-the-tow-truck-front-line/

The previous blog post Just one hitch: Tales and tips from the tow-truck front line Find more on: kildare.apextowing.ie/

Lake government towing fee gets the hook

CROWN POINT — Towing in Lake County just got cheaper.

Six County Council members voted unanimously Tuesday to abolish the $50 fee they once charged towing firms each time they removed a car from the public streets and highways on behalf of county police. Councilman Jamal Washington, D-Merrillville, was absent.

The council first created the fee in 2012 at Sheriff John Buncich’s request to fund the salaries of several police officers he otherwise would have been forced to lay off when the recession and state-mandated tax cuts were forcing employee cuts in other county government departments.

 Towing

But tax revenues have recovered since the end of the recession and the council passed a 1.5 percent personal income tax, so those officers are no longer in danger of being laid off.

Lake County Commission President Mike Repay asked the council to rescind the fee. Although Repay voted for the fee when he sat on the council in 2012, he said Tuesday he now has a better understanding of government finances.

He said the county cannot identify any other government cost the fee reimburses, and the county doesn’t charge similar fees to its other business vendors.

Repay said rescinding this fee will cost the county $80,000 a year, but the county will still charge car owners a $75 fee to recover their cars from the towing companies and increase that fee in the future if government oversight of towing justifies the cost.

In addition, the Council voted 4-2 to borrow $12 million to continue removing asbestos, installing security and modernizing the four-decade-old County Government Center.

Councilman Dan Dernulc, R-Highland, and Councilman Eldon Strong, R-Crown Point, oppose authorizing further debt.  “We must learn to live within our means, rather than borrowing,” Strong said.

Council President Ted Bilski, D-Hobart, said interest rates are currently low and putting off needed improvements will only increase their cost if done later.

Bilski, Council members Christine Cid, D-East Chicago; Elsie Franklin, D-Gary; and David Hamm, D-Hammond, voted in favor of the $12 million bond, which could win final approval on second reading by the July 11 council meeting.

The council voted 4-2 to hire a second deputy director for the Lake County E-911 public safety communications department.

Strong said the hiring is unnecessary for now, and the salary should be lowered since the two deputy directors will now split the duties formerly done by one person. But the council majority agreed the deputy directors will be paid $77,250 each.

The council also split 4-2 along party lines in approving the purchase of an eight-passenger van for $31,000 for use by the Lake County Weights and Measures Department.

Weights Director Christine Clay said she needs the van so employees can haul equipment needed to verify the accuracy of gasoline pumps, commercial scales and for department employees to travel to out-of-town training sessions and conventions.

Read more: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/lake-government-towing-fee-gets-the-hook/article_c1fd781a-e4a7-5a0e-82bf-f852db6d770f.html

The blog post Lake government towing fee gets the hook is republished from galway.apextowing.ie/

Father, kids work together in Cedar City towing company

This Father’s Day, Ladd Brindley is celebrating the opportunity to employ three of his children through his new towing company.

As a former mechanic and part-time tow truck driver for Cedar City Motor Company (formerly Parkway Autoplex), Ladd raised his children with a love for towing. Now three of them — Laramy, 23; Wyatt, 21; and Jessi, 18 — are in the towing business with him.

Image result for tow truck family

“They’ve been sitting next to me (in a tow truck) ever since they were able to sit in a car seat,” Ladd says. “My kids love tow trucks. They always have.”

Ladd notes that even though Laramy is only 23, he already has 21 years of experience in the business. Laramy began practicing towing skills in earnest as a teen. Ladd came home once to find him driving a pickup with a trailer around a makeshift obstacle course.

Even Laramy’s young son, Chaidyn, has caught the tow truck bug.

“He’s 2 years old and all his toys are tow trucks,” Laramy says. “It’s in his blood.”

Ladd recently struck a deal with Cedar City Motor Company to start his own business. He opened Ladd’s Towing, on Feb. 1, operating out of an office owned by Cedar City Motor in exchange for serving all of his previous employer’s towing needs.

Starting his own business also enabled Ladd to hand-pick his employees. Naturally he went to the three people he had personally trained for many years: his own kids.

Laramy and Wyatt both have commercial driver licenses, so they are able to drive the tow trucks. Jessi assists them on calls, often steering the broken-down vehicles as they are loaded on and off the tow trucks.

Jessi, who graduated from Canyon View High School last month, is already studying for her own CDL. She hopes to acquire her commercial license before she begins classes at Southern Utah University this fall to study business.

Like her brothers, the towing industry has intrigued Jessi since she was a small child.

“These guys are pretty much my role models — especially my dad,” Jessi says. “I like that he sees me as not a typical girly-girl.”

Laramy admits the male members of the family do worry about Jessi when they are out on certain jobs. But that worry also encourages them to teach her as much as they can.

Jessi says she’s grateful they don’t treat her like a “regular girl,” despite her slight build and long blond hair.

“We’re sticking to staying away from that stereotype,” she says. “That’s the plan.”

Ladd says they all try to avoid another stereotype: the “greasy, filthy tow truck driver.” In defiance of that stereotype they wear new Ladd’s Towing shirts and trucker-style hats with the company logo (Jessi’s hat is pink). The back of the hats display a little tow truck humor: “Get hooked on us.”

Ladd also insists that his tow trucks be clean, inside and out. Since she cannot yet drive the trucks, one of Jessi’s tasks is vacuuming the truck interiors to make sure they look professional.

“He’s a real stickler about that,” Jessi says of her father. “He wants the trucks to look nice.”

Jessi says it’s fun to tell people about her interest in towing. The only time her peers have given her a hard time about it was when she presented a report in school about how she wanted to be a tow truck driver.

Her eventual goal is to do the “big tows” associated with major automobile crashes. While she already rides along to help with clean-ups at crash sites, Jessi says she is still learning about all the aspects of responding to serious incidents.

As for working with his kids, Ladd calls it a “dream come true.”

“It’s not even like a job,” he says. “It’s like we’re on a vacation all the time, just hanging out.”

Laramy and Jessi joke that it’s like a vacation for their father because he gets to take every day off. After all, he’s the boss.

But when it comes down to it, they all recognize how lucky they are to have a father for a boss. Many fathers provide for their families in different ways, but they are able to say that their father has provided them with employment.

While individual tows often separate them, larger wrecks might bring the family members together at the same time. Ladd says he has a “no fighting” rule for his employees but Wyatt says their only disputes typically focus on who gets to drive the truck with the best stereo.

Past jobs have been a struggle for Laramy but now he says he doesn’t worry about getting fired. If he messes up while working for his dad, he knows the boss might just send him home for the day.

Ladd’s wife, Maria, says she admires the company her husband has built in less than five months.

“He has an idea and follows through,” she says. “It’s nice to see him succeed, to go from where he was to where he is now. I’m always amazed.”

Read more: http://www.thespectrum.com/story/life/2017/06/15/father-kids-work-together-cedar-city-towing-company/400552001/

The post Father, kids work together in Cedar City towing company was originally seen on Apex Towing – Cork

Oregon looks to crack down on predatory towing

Senate Bill 117 would require towers to receive written, signed authority from a parking facility’s owner or agent before towing.

The bill prohibits vehicles from being towed unless a sign in plain view prohibits or restricts public parking.

It requires towers to release vehicles that have been hooked up, but not yet towed, if an owner or driver is present, although they can charge a hookup fee if the hookup is complete.

And it requires towers to provide vehicle owners or operators with a photograph of the vehicle illegally parked on request.

The bill passed Monday on a unanimous vote with nine members excused.

Senate Bill 488 aims to protect victims of auto theft, who can face steep towing and storage fees to get recovered vehicles back.

It requires that law enforcement agencies provide towers with the vehicle owner’s contact information, and specifies that fees for storage cannot accrue until the tower first attempts notification.

The process currently takes about 30 days and can leave owners owing more money to the tower than the vehicle is worth.

The bill also allows the owner of a stolen vehicle that is totaled to transfer the vehicle’s title to the towing company in full or partial payment of towing fees.

“It helps minimize the harm and costs to victims of car theft whose cars are towed at no fault of their own,” said Rep. Andy Olson, R-Albany, who carried the bill.

It passed unanimously Tuesday with four members excused.

Oregon’s Department of Justice received 131 written complaints about towers in 2016.

In 2009, the Legislature passed a law that requires tow truck operators to take a photo of the vehicle showing it parked in violation before towing. They can only monitor lots, or sit in wait for violators, if the hours during which monitoring occurs are clearly posted in the lot. And they must release a vehicle before towing if the owner is present, charging only the hook-up fee.

In 2013 the Legislature passed a law allowing cities and counties to regulate towing if they choose. Portland, Gresham and Tualatin regulate tows from private lots.

Read More: http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/2017/06/14/oregon-looks-crack-down-predatory-towing/374726001/

The previous article Oregon looks to crack down on predatory towing Find more on: limerick.apextowing.ie